Older news

For archiving purposes, this is the main site news page. See here the older news and the the site’s growth since February 2017.

 

  • 17 canons from Gegenbach’s Musica Nova (1626) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • The unique canon published in Holtheuser’s Ein kleine deutsche Musica (1586) was added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • Quirsfeld’s Breviarium musicum (1675) is one of the most prolific printed sources of didactic canons, which received several editions until 1717. Check out the 46 canons from its 1688 edition we had access. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 3 canons from Quitschreiber’s Musikbüchlein für die Jugend (1607) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 15 canons from a late 17th-century source, Speer’s Grundrichtiger Unterricht der musikalischen Kunst (1697), were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • Steuerlein’s Fugae viginti ex solmizandi exercitio (1596) is an interesting late 16th-century source that deals with the practise of solmization and musical modes through canons. Check out all of them added to the site and see the sources section for more details.
  • 17 canons from Gebenbach’s Musica Nova (1626) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 15 more canons from one of the most prolific sources of didactic canons, Gesius’ Synopsis musicae practicae (1615), were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 4 canons from Gradenthaler’s Horologium musicum (1687) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • The unique canon published in Harnisch’s Artis musicae delineatio (1608) was added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 3 canons from Hase’s Gründliche Einführung in die edle Music oder Singe Kunst (1657) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 3 canons from Hoffmann’s Musicae practicae praecepta communiora in usum juventutis stratsundensis conscripta (1578), another 16th-century music treatise intended for young people, was added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 8 canons from Lange’s Methodus nova et perspicua in artem musicam (1688) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • Some treatises publish canons from well know composers to illustrate some aspect of music theory. For instance, we can find the ‘Benedictus qui venit‘ by Antonie Brumel in Lossius’ Erotemata musicae practicae (1590), the unique canon from that source. See the Sources section for more details.
  • Johannes Magirus’ Artis musicae, methodice legibus logicis informatae libri duo (1596) is an interesting late 16th-century treatise which deals with musical modes through didactic canons. Check out its 30 examples and see the Sources section for more details.
  • 13 canons from Mylius’ Rudimenta musices (1686) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • Another member of Praetorius family published a treatise in 1574, which is one of the largest sources of published didactic canons in the 16th-century. It’s the Erotemata musices written by Christoph Praetorius. Check out its 41 canons and see the Sources section for more details.
  • 11 canons from Johannes Praetorius’ Musicae practicae et arithmeticae generaliora praecepta (1629) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 39 canons from a late 16th-century source, Hexachordum seu questiones musicae practicae (1591) by Andera Raselius were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 10 canons from a short treatise by Johannes Reusch called Elementa musicae practicae pro incipientibus (1553) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • The unique canon from a large 16th-century source, Bellum musicale inter plani et mensuralis cantus reges (1563) by Claudius Sebastiani, was added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 2 short canons from Staden’s Rudimentum musicum (1648) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 17 canons from Thuringus’ Opusculum bipartitum de primordiis musicis (1624) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 34 canons from a large source of canons, Trautmann’s Musicae compendium latino-germanicum (1618) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 12 canons from Walliser’s Musicae figuralis praecepta brevia (1611) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 5 canons from two 16th-century treatises written by Ambrosius Wilfflingseder, Musica teutsch (1561) and Erotemata musices practicae (1563), were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 2 short canons from a printed large sheet with a music theory summary called Definitio, divisio musices, et eius subdivisio (1557) by Michael Vogt (1526-1606) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • We verified that 3 treatises written by Johann Crüger (1598-1662) we had access until now have didactic canons. All those 7 from Synopsis Musica (1654), excluding the double canons, were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • The only 2 canons from Zanger’s Practicae musicae praecepta (1554) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 6 canons from Burmeister’s Musica autoschediastike (1601) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 15 canons from a late 17th century source, Ahle’s Kurze doch deutliche Anleitung zu der lieblich- und löblichen Singekunst (1690), were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 20 more canons from Raselius’s Hexachordum (1589) were added to the site. 19 other canons from that source are coming soon. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 26 canons from Gesius’s Synopsis musicae practicae (1615) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 20 more canons from Raselius’s Hexachordum (1589) were added to the site. 19 other canons from that source are coming soon. See the Sources section for more details.
  • While we try to solve the puzzle of Gumpelzhaimer’s Compendium musicae editions (which spam from 1591 to 1681 in 13 different editions – as far we know), check out the 4 canons from its first edition.
  • 8 canons from Crüger’s Musicae practicae (1660) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
  • 2 canons from Faber’s Compendiolum musicae (Nuremberg, 1594) were added to the site. See the Sources section for more details.
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